Archive for May, 2018

More Sliding Lid Boxes – Hexagons

I had good success last year making simple sliding lid pencil boxes for the Dupage Woodworkers Club. My construction method is documented in this Weblog post. This spring I adapted the method and jigs to produce six sided boxes. The hexagonal box construction is very similar to the earlier rectangular pencil boxes so please refer to that post for details. Here I will describe the few differences.

Obviously there are two more side pieces to deal with. That’s the bad news. The good news is they are all the same length so the spacer is not required. I expected the glue up to be a big problem with the additional surfaces but with slow setting Old Brown liquid hide glue it hasn’t been an issue. There are two handle pieces to cut instead of one, and making the hexagonal lid plates is more complicated.

First, the math. The hexagonal lid plates are made from rectangular blanks. The length of the rectangular blank is the width divided by cosine of 30 degrees. To find the length of the side pieces, take half the lid blank width, add the thickness of the side stock, subtract 1/8″, then divide by the cosine of 30 degrees. Trust me, it works.

I’m using a Diablo 7 1/4″ 40 tooth finishing blade now, it cuts a very narrow kerf. I modified my regular cross cut sled to cut the lid hexagons. There is a batten tacked to the sled to establish the 30 degree angle. Actually it worked better to measure 150 degrees from the fence face on the obtuse side of the batten. This angle is critical. Next I added a movable stop to position the rectangular blank at the correct spot.

Hex Lid Jig Stop Down

Hex Lid Jig Stop Down

The stop has a hinged end, as I quickly found the small triangular cutoffs would catch on the saw blade and be launched into low earth orbit. Raising the stop lets the cutoff fall free.

Hex Lid Jig Stop Raised

Hex Lid Jig Stop Raised

The movable stop has to be calibrated to match the lid stock. I draw the hexagon onto one of the blanks then the long side of the rectangle is placed against the batten with the corner touching the stop. The stop is tweaked until the blade cuts on the line. I cut the marked blank half way to see how it’s going, then loosen the stop screws and adjust. Once the stop is calibrated it’s simply rotating a rectangular blank until the four edges are cut off.

I made a you tube video of the jig cutting a hexagon. It’s the best way to see what’s going on.

Here’s enough lids to make sixteen boxes. It goes very quickly.

Completed Hexagonal Lids

Completed Hexagonal Lids

Cutting the six side pieces requires a dedicated cross cut sled with the blade set at 30 degrees off vertical (60 degrees from the saw table). I use an adjustable flip stop as described in the sliding lid box post. There is a note at the end of the pencil box post for Doug Stowe’s method that does not require the stop to flip up.

30 Degree Crosscut Sled

30 Degree Crosscut Sled

To calibrate the stop, make the first bevel by raising the stop and bringing the stock in from the left with face side up. Note if you have a saw with a right tilt blade, these directions will be reversed.

Side Jig Second Cut

Side Jig First Cut

Measure and mark the side length on the stock then with the stock on the right side, carefully place the mark right at the saw kerf in the sled fence. Adjust the stop to that position and cut the second bevel. Once the stop is calibrated the rest of the sides go quickly. 16 boxes will need 192 cuts. For these boxes I saved time by cutting the lid grooves in the long stock before the stock was sliced into sides.

Side Jig Second Cut

Side Jig Second Cut

The side pieces are dot marked to maintain grain direction.  Designating the two pieces with three dots for handles makes the opening side exactly opposite the starting grain discontinuity. Rabbiting the lid plates and cutting off the handles is similar to the rectangular box procedure.

Gluing the hex box is similar to gluing the pencil boxes but the assembly jig is different. It now has three sides, one adjustable to account for different sized boxes. People with six hands might not need the assembly jig.

Adjustable Hex Box Assembly Jig

Adjustable Hex Box Assembly Jig

This is the jig with a box nestled between the battens. It’s a dry fit with rubber bands. I use stronger bands cut from bicycle inner tubes for the real glue up.

Hex Box Assembly Jig In Action

Hex Box Assembly Jig In Action

These are the first couple of boxes made from construction pine during the debugging phase of the jigs. Cupped lid stock is more a problem with these than it was with the narrower pencil boxes.

First Hex Boxes

First Hex Boxes

I made a number of boxes from Cherry. These two were specially done for the Beads of Courage project. Before slicing the sides, I glued on a beveled strip of Cherry at the top and bottom, and inset a small strip of Maple in the top edge. They are about 7″ wide.

First Hex Boxes

Beads of Courage Boxes in Cherry

These are the sixteen boxes made for the club Christmas drive. Menards had glued up, 1x12x48″ Poplar panels on sale for $5, I bought two. With careful measurement and calculations each panel made eight boxes.

Completed Run Sixteen Hexagonal Boxes

Completed Run Sixteen Hexagonal Boxes

 

Update August 2018. Five boxes made for the Dupage Woodworkers fall Beads of Courage project. Cherry with strips of Aspen as accent.

Beads of Courage boxes

Beads of Courage boxes

 

Update September 2018. Trying a vertical pencil box design. I like it. Doesn’t take up so much room on your desk. If I make them a little bit longer, will be good to store spaghetti.

Crosscut sled not needed, just tilt the blade and use the fence. Gluing is easier because it’s all long grain but the top and bottom edges are now end grain which makes the lid slot weak. Each one of these used about 11 inches of a 1×6.

Vertical Pencil Box

Vertical Pencil Box

 

Sliding Lid Pencil Boxes

Sliding Lid Pencil Boxes

 

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Small Router Table

Our local woodworkers club makes wooden toys every year as Christmas presents for disadvantaged children. Most of these are band sawn shapes from 2 inch stock. They are cut out, drilled, sanded, and then we do a round over on all exposed edges. I made small router tables as dedicated tools for the round over step. This post will outline my construction though I’m using photos of the finished product.

Small Router Tables

Small Router Tables

 

Small trim routers are perfectly adequate for a 1/8″ or 3/16″ round over. I have a Dewalt and a Porter Cable so made two tables.  I selected 3/8″ plywood for the table top as I had scraps on hand salvaged from (should be obvious) cable reels. Quarter inch ply might flex too much and a half inch thick table might require extending the router bit uncomfortably far. For this dedicated application, a 12 -14″ width and an 8″ depth is fine.

The first step is locating screw holes to mount the router. I removed the base plate and used that to mark the location of the four holes. Remember the router will be upside down so the mounting plate here is bottom side up. The Porter Cable router has an asymmetrical hole pattern so this is important.

Lay Out Mounting Holes

Lay Out Mounting Holes

 

Both my routers have round head mounting screws for the base plate so to match, the screw holes need to be counterbored to sink the screw heads below the table surface. Do this first with a forstner bit, then drill through with a smaller bit to fit the screw threads.  Don’t counterbore so deep that the screw attachment is weakened.

Mounting Holes Counterbored

Mounting Holes Counterbored

 

Also at this time mark and drill a pilot hole for the router bit to come through the table. Just make a hole big enough for the bearing to come through, probably 1/2″ or 5/8″. The hole will be opened up to clear the cutting edges later on.

Locate Hole for Bit

Locate Hole for Bit

 

I added a 3/4 inch bit of scrap to the bottom of the table to provide a boss for extra leg stiffness. These are attached with countersunk screws from the table top. The legs are set into holes drilled with a 10-15 degree splay angle. Splay is not absolutely necessary but makes the table more rigid when it’s clamped down. Leg dowels should be at least 1/2 inch thick and long enough that you don’t have to bend over to allow your glasses to focus on the bit. 10-12″ is good.

Support Boss for Legs

Support Boss for Legs

 

I used a piece of 3/4 stock to make the table feet. Notice the legs are offset from center to provide a larger area for clamps. I located the foot holes by assembling the legs into top, then marking where the splayed legs touched the feet.

Table Foot

Table Foot

 

This photo shows the splayed legs assembled and glued. The feet need to be parallel to the table. I ensured this by clamping the feet to the workbench while glue was applied. I then set a heavy weight on the table top while the glue was setting.

Table Legs Splayed

Table Legs Splayed

 

Getting a consistent splay angle for the legs is not difficult. I made this tapered jig for the drill press. The exact angle is not critical as long as all eight holes are drilled the same. 10-12 degrees is good. A clearly marked center line is important.

Tapered Jig to Guide Splay

Tapered Jig to Guide Splay

 

Pick a spot at the center of the table bottom and draw sight lines to where each leg hole will be drilled. The legs will lean out exactly on those lines.

Splay Sight Lines

Splay Sight Lines

 

Photos here are from my completed table so I marked another bit of scrap to better show how the sight lines are laid out on the two bosses.

Lay Out Leg Boss

Lay Out Leg Boss

 

Here you see the tapered jig clamped to the drill press table. Align the sight line on the boss with the center line on the jig and drill.

Taper Splay Jig Aligns Hole

Taper Splay Jig Aligns Hole

 

Then align and drill for the other leg.

Right Side Hole

Right Side Hole

 

The feet are drilled similarly. Here I used the upper boss to mark the sight line angle on the foot after finding where the holes go by inserting the leg dowels into the top boss. Note when you are drilling the splay direction along the sight line is opposite for the feet. On the top the legs lean out. On the bottom they lean in.

Once the feet are drilled, you can clamp and glue the whole thing together.

Duplicating Angle on Feet

Duplicating Angle on Feet

 

When the glue is set up, I assembled the router to the table. The router bearing should clear the hole at the top but not yet the rest of the roundover bit.

Pilot Hole for Router Bit

Pilot Hole for Router Bit

 

With the table clamped down in working position, I start the router and slowly raise the bit. The bit’s cutters open the hole to make a perfect zero clearance opening.

Bit Raised Through Table Top

Bit Raised Through Table Top

 

This photo shows the finished table clamped to my work bench. I sanded and sealed the top with a couple coats of danish oil, then applied paste wax. The toys slide over the bit really smooth. You have to route a bit of scrap a few times to get the bit height set exactly right.

Table Clamped to Bench

Table Clamped to Bench

 

Just slide the blank into the bit until it touches the bearing then run it to the left to do the roundover. Yo need to experiment some as moving too fast will result in a ragged edge, moving too slow will burn the wood. Needless to say, keep your fingers away from the bit, and also be aware that sometimes the bit will grab bad grain or a knot and throw the piece off the table.

Routing Roundovers

Routing Roundovers

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