More Fun With Direct Digital Synthesis: Adafruit Feather 32u4

Feather Port with Volume Control

Long walks are a good thing and I’ve taken along one of my morse code keyers running in practice mode to pass the time. Neither of the keyers I made fit pockets very well so I decided to build yet another one, battery operated, with headphone only output. The target container is an Altoids Small tin easily carried in a shirt pocket.

An Adafruit Feather 32u4 Basic has built in USB and an on board battery charger so it is a good start for this project. I ported my previous 32u4 code easily. Reference my previous page on the 32u4 experiments here. Driving headphones directly from a Pulse Width Modulated output is different from my previous projects where I used a small audio amplifier to drive a speaker. Headphones have a much lower impedance than an amp so RC filter components change radically. Implementing a volume control would be a challenge. I tried a 500 ohm trim pot and that worked fairly well with some but not all of the headphones I tried. But I couldn’t find a pot with a shaft that would fit in the Altoids tin.

With PWM Direct Digital Synthesizer generating a sine wave I might be able to throttle the PWM output with software. I have an Adafruit Rotary Encoder that fits the Altoids tin if I’m careful so I worked that into the demo program.  Rotary Encoders are basically mechanical, therefore subject to contact bounce like any other switch. I Googled up a half dozen different Encoder sketches and all of them would glitch badly. I finally found code by Oleg Mazurov that uses a Grey coding technique to ignore invalid inputs. It works well. I was able to get that code running on the Feather and contributed the sketch to the Adafruit Feather forum.

This photo shows the slightly truncated Feather in the Altoids Small tin. The encoder is the green object in the center of the lid. There are a couple of Oscilloscope umbilicals attached and the battery is not yet installed.

Changing the apparent volume of the DDS output is a process of multiplying the Sine table values by a volume parameter between zero and one. I copy the Sine table into RAM and apply this transform. But since I use only integer math in the sketch, the method is, read the value from flash then multiply by 0-63 volume, then divide the result by 63. Close enough.

One more improvement: in the original sketch, even when the volume is set to zero the PWM signals are 50% high and 50% low, averaging zero as far as the Sine wave coupled through the output capacitor is concerned. That means the output pin is still driving full voltage at the PWM frequency. With the low load impedance it’s a significant drain on the DC power and I’m using a very small battery. The remedy was to lower the zero crossing base line in step with lowering the amplitude of the Sine table.  A new volatile variable maxSine passes the necessary correction to the DDS Interrupt Service Routine. The ISR doesn’t like having it’s variables changed on the fly. Rotating the Encoder makes a scratchy sound like a dirty potentiometer but it’s fine when you stop adjusting.

I measured 18 milliamps constant draw from the USB supply before implementing the zero crossing shift. With the shift, current varies from 10 ma at zero volume to 17.6 ma at maximum volume. The 150 mah battery should last 6-10 hours, way more than my morse code attention span.

My example sketch with all the experimental options in the previous version is downloadable from Dropbox. A short video showing the waveforms produced is on YouTube.

References:
https://www.circuitsathome.com/mcu/rotary-encoder-interrupt-service-routine-for-avr-micros/
https://www.circuitsathome.com/mcu/reading-rotary-encoder-on-arduino/

Files:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/t1fud02jcfdhxjl/Feather32u4V2.zip?dl=0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbv-z4wvXI8&feature=youtu.be

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    • ralph boumenot
    • May 23rd, 2017

    I am amazed by what you can stuff into an empty Altoids tin.

    • The time required to complete a project is inversely proportional to the size of the box you’re putting it in.

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