Still More Fun With Direct Digital Synthesis: TeensyLC with DAC

I posted a link to my previous page on setting up PWM Direct Digital Synthesized sine waves on PJRC’s Teensy 2.0, a 32u4 Arduino. Paul Stoffregen (the PJ in PJRC) commented that I should try porting my DDS demo sketch to a TeensyLC. “You won’t need PWM” he said. “Use the Digital Analog Converter” he said. I was a bit hesitant because TeensyLC has an ARM processor running at 48 Mhz. Quite a bit more power than the Atmel 16 Mhz chips and more I/O capability, so worth a look.  PJRC supplies an Arduino IDE add on called Teensyduino which configures support for PJRC boards so simply doing an analogWrite to pin A12 (took me a while to actually find A12) starts the DAC instead of starting PWM. Teensyduino has an included library IntervalTimer which sets a repetitive timer running and attaches that to an Interrupt Service Routine which you supply.  So an LC port should be simple as the dirty work of configuring the timer is taken care of.

Arduino PWM based DDS uses a fixed sample rate of 31 or 62 Khz and the interrupt generated sine wave has to fit into that constraint. That means low frequency audio tones are relatively smooth as there are lots of sample periods to go around even with the 256 step tables. High audio frequencies on the other hand, suffer distortion as the shorter period audio wave can’t fit in enough sample periods.

In the TeensyLC, the DAC always gets a fixed number of bits so you change the interrupt frequency to change the frequency of the generated audio tone. For instance, using the 256 step table, to generate a 1000 Hz tone requires 1000 * 256 interrupts per second. That’s about one every four microseconds, which even with the 48 Mhz processor clock, is going to use a LOT of CPU time. The shortest period I could set with IntervalTimer was 5 microseconds, my experiments with the demo program showed a maximum audio frequency of 650 Hz with the 256 step table, the 128 table limited at 1300 Hz, and the 64 step table maxed out at 2600 Hz.

Another down side to the DAC method stems from the fact that the audio frequency granularity is determined by the 1 microsecond granularity of the IntervalTimer function multiplied by the number of steps in the sine table.  The demo program shows this while sweeping. Low audio frequencies sweep smoothly but the higher frequencies have very noticeable jumps. Higher sine table sizes show this effect much more.

But the output wave form is much better than PWM. The following photos were shot using the Quarter Wave symmetry version of the demo sketch. Full table version traces were identical. All these were taken at a set audio frequency of 440 Hz. The filter was a single 10K resistor in series with the output pin, and a 0.01 ufd capacitor to ground. You can see the wave period changing a bit with the different table sizes. That is due to the granularity issue.

TeensyLC DAC Bottom - Raw, Top - Filtered 256 Step Table, Quarter Wave

TeensyLC DAC Bottom – Raw, Top – Filtered
256 Step Table, Quarter Wave

 

TeensyLC DAC Bottom - Raw, Top - Filtered 128 Step Table, Quarter Wave

TeensyLC DAC Bottom – Raw, Top – Filtered
128 Step Table, Quarter Wave

 

TeensyLC DAC Bottom - Raw, Top - Filtered 64 Step Table, Quarter Wave

TeensyLC DAC Bottom – Raw, Top – Filtered
64 Step Table, Quarter Wave

 

TeensyLC DAC Bottom - Raw, Top - Filtered 32 Step Table, Quarter Wave

TeensyLC DAC Bottom – Raw, Top – Filtered
32 Step Table, Quarter Wave Symmetry

 

TeensyLC DAC Bottom - Raw, Top - Filtered 16 Step Table, Quarter Wave Symmetry

TeensyLC DAC Bottom – Raw, Top – Filtered
16 Step Table, Quarter Wave Symmetry

I will probably use the TeensyLC in my next version of morse keyer.  I have to find a 16×2 LCD that will work at 3.3 volts, figure out how to interface a 5 volt PS2 keyboard, and how to charge and connect a 5 volt battery pack. The LC (and the 32u4) have USB serial built in which will make interfacing a terminal window on a logging computer a lot easier.

I found a useful web page showing how you implement quarter wave sine symmetry DDS on an FPGA and I took this opportunity to streamline the quarter wave ISR. You have to be familiar with bit banging to understand it now.

The demo sketches, full table and quarter table versions, and the Libre spreadsheet I used to develop the quarter wave half step offset tables are included in the archive at:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/40929640/ArduinoSineSynth/TeensyLC_DDS_Demos.zip

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  1. I feel like I should “Like” this post, just because it’s difficult for me to find a sentence I can understand without googling something.

    • HA! If you only knew how many hours I spent on Google researching that project…

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